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Cats and Kittens Vaccinations

Cat Vaccinations | Indoor and Outdoor Cats

Kittens and cats are at risk from many serious infections. However, they can be protected by a simple vaccination program. As both cats and their owners are very mobile it is likely that your pet will come into contact with infections present in unvaccinated cats or in contaminated environment. Vaccination is a cost-effective way of protecting your cat or kitten against serious disease and the possible high costs involved in their treatment. Kittens and cats can be protected by the following vaccination program.

Indoor Cats

AGE VACCINATION
8 WEEKS

F3 Vaccinates against:
• Feline Panleukopaenia
• Feline Rhinotracheitis
• Feline Calici Virus

12 WEEKS

F4 Vaccinates against:
• Feline Panleukopaenia
• Feline Rhinotracheitis
• Feline Calici Virus
• Feline Leukaemia Virus

16 WEEKS

F4 Vaccinates against:
• Feline Panleukopaenia
• Feline Rhinotracheitis
• Feline Calici Virus
• Feline Leukaemia Virus

Feline Enteritis

Feline Panleukopania Virus, is a serious viral disease of cats. It is highly contagious and can spread rapidly. Kittens and young cats under 12 months of age are the most susceptible.

Signs of disease include depression, vomiting, diarrhoea (commonly containing blood), marked dehydration and severe abdominal pain. If queens contract the disease whilst pregnant, the kittens may be born with co-ordination problems or other abnormalities.

The virus is very hardy and survives well in the environment. The small number of cats that do become infected and survive can carry the virus for some time. They can still infect other cats.

Feline Respiratory Disease (Cat Flu)

This disease complex is almost always caused by one of two viruses, calicivirus or rhinotracheitis virus.

These viruses can infect cats of all ages and the disease is very easily spread from cat to cat through coughing or sneezing.

Signs of this disease complex include sneezing, nasal and ocular discharge, depressed appetite and ulcers on the tongue and/or eyes. Some of these signs can last for many weeks and cause significant discomfort.

This disease complex commonly occurs in multi-cat households. It is not uncommon for cats to become carriers after they have recovered from this disease and to infect other cats and, particularly, kittens.

Feline Leukaemia

This disease is caused by the feline leukaemia virus and can be transmitted by infected cats years after they were initially infected. Approximately one third of infected cats remain infected until they die years later.

These cats can transmit the disease in their saliva, tears, urine and nasal secretions. As with other contagious diseases, this virus can be transmitted by sharing communal feeding areas, litter trays and toys and by mutual grooming.

The disease often leads to a depressed appetite, weight loss, anaemia, vomiting, diarrhoea, reproductive problems and a highly increased risk of developing other infections and tumours. These signs can present years after the initial infection.

Outdoor Cats:

Feline Immune Deficiency Virus (FIV)

If your cat is going outdoors, she will need the above mentioned vaccination program as well as Feline Immune Deficiency Virus (FIV) vaccine. FIV is spread through bite wounds during cat fights. Tom cats protect their territory and will attack any cat that comes near it. Apart from running the risk of cat bite abscesses, FIV is a real tread that will break down your cat’s immune system and make her prone to other infections and shorten her life. In Western Australia 30 % of cats are infected.

Initially the vaccination is given three times with two-week intervals. After that it is repeated once a year.