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Wildlife Care

 

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Caring for Australian Wildlife

At Hilton Vet Hospital we would gladly treat injured wildlife. We are passionate about our native wildlife and usually treat them for no cost.

If a native wild animal or bird is brought in we will give it the initial treatment and if it needs ongoing care we will pass it on to Native Arc who will look after it till they can safely release it again.

If you find an injured wild animal, please keep in mind that it will find human contact severely stress full. Try and keep the animal in a dark well ventilated container or cover it with a towel or blanket. Be aware they do bite and scratch when they are scared. Most injured wildlife will be dehydrated to some degree by the time you find it. If there is any delay in taking it to the vet, try and give some water with a syringe or spoon and keep the animal warm.

If the animal is not badly injured you can take it directly to Native Arc on 60 Hope Road Bibra Lake.
Tel. 9417 7105 or after hours on 0409 102 651.

   

WILD LIFE RESCUE:
www.nativearc.org.au

Project Numbat

ProjectNumbat

Hilton Vet Clinic supports Project Numbat. You are welcome to give a donation to Project Numbat when you visit us again or visit them on their website.

The Numbat is under threat from habitat loss and introduced predators such as foxes and feral cats. With an estimated population of less than 1500 individuals, we need your help to protect the future of this unique marsupial.

Numbats are insectivores and eat an exclusive diet of termites. An adult Numbat requires up to 20,000 termites each day. It is because of their diet that the Numbat is diurnal and their daily activity changes throughout the year. Just as the termites become active at different times of the day depending on the season, so do Numbats. In winter, Numbats are active in the middle of the day, while during summer they rise earlier and try to avoid the heat of the midday sun.

LINKS:

www.numbat.org.au